SUPPORT FROM GFC RELIEVES CONFLICT-AFFECTED GIRL FROM THE STRUGGLES OF FEES

SUPPORT FROM GFC RELIEVES CONFLICT-AFFECTED GIRL FROM THE STRUGGLES OF FEES

Mokomiku Christine at RICE-WN Offices
Mokomiku Christine at RICE-WN Offices

Conflict-affected Christine Mokomiku, aged 18, is a senior three student of Cornerstone Secondary School in Arua district having shifted from Logiri Girls’ Secondary School. She was affected and suffered various forms abuse by South Sudan conflict that also led to the death of her father.

Christine is one of the 14 conflict-affected girls (7 in secondary school and 7 in vocational training) benefiting from a partnership between Rural Initiative for Community Empowerment–West Nile (RICE-WN) and the Global Fund for Children (GFC) supporting conflict-affected girls in school and those in vocational training since 2014.

She has never looked back ever since she got her training in bakery as part of the package to support the retention of the girls in school. “Nowadays I can make my cakes and even on Christmas day, I made my Christmas cake which was a pleasure to my family members, they were very happy of it,” joyous Christine told RICE-WN.

During the third term holiday, she engaged in making pancakes to support her livelihood. Having started with twenty five thousand Ugandan shillings (UGX 25,000=) she has managed to earn up to one hundred fifty thousand Ugandan shillings (UGX 150,000=).

Christine attributes her success to the support that RICE-WN and the Global Fund for Children have extended which has made her very happy and a role model among her peers in the community since she is able to fend for her education and livelihood.

“I am happy because I’ve been struggling alone to search for my school fees but as per now RICE-WN and the Global Fund for Children are giving me half of my school fees and other materials like books, pens and some other things for school [learning materials],” she said.

Since the start of the support in 2014, Christine is committed to improving in her studies despite challenges she has been experiencing in retention and learning at school.

“My plan for this year is that I have to be in school, I have to work hard to perform very well though I have challenges in other subjects but I must make sure that this year I have to work hard to improve on them,” determined Christine promised RICE-WN.

She continued: “I am going to be close to my teachers so that I have extra time for explanations so that I can at least get something in it and will have to concentrate on my books because since I would be thinking about the school fees for the rest of the term, nowadays the fees is partly sponsored by RICE-WN and partly by me. So by that I think at least am saved right now.” Christine is determined to progress with her education up to institution level until she is able to be gainfully employed.

Rural Initiative for Community Empowerment – West Nile (RICE-WN) is one of the seven grassroots organizations in Uganda supported by The Global Fund for Children, in partnership with the MacArthur Foundation, to address barriers relating to enrollment, retention, learning and progression in school and vocational/livelihood training for conflict-affected girls.

TALE OF A MIDIA HOUSEHOLD TO ATTAIN ODF STATUS IN 5 DAYS

TALE OF A MIDIA HOUSEHOLD TO ATTAIN ODF STATUS IN 5 DAYS

Midia Success Story - Pitcha

On 27th November 2015, RICE WN Midia team had a household follow-up to Ifoko Village, Kingaba Parish in Midia sub-county. This village was triggered on 02/09/2015 and the village resolved that every household must contract a latrine and install other facilities such as Tippy Taps and scot hall covers to achieve ODF status as they also agreed that a penalty shall be laid on those who faulted the agreement.

Mr. Pitcha Agustino, the LC I by the time of triggering had no latrine and promised to build one. He had two families where in one family he has constructed a latrine and installed a Tippy Tap and a scot hall cover. He has been promising the other woman that he would construct a latrine, and this took nearly (3) three months. When RICE extension staff went on ground for the house hold follow up on 27/11/2015, they found Mr. Pitcha had not yet constructed a latrine in one of his homes; the team triggered him and he promised to start excavating a pit latrine that same day the team was on ground. After five (5) hours, the team checked on him and found he sunk about three (3) fits (See FIGURE 1). Mr. Pitcha promised to build acceptable latrine to attain ODF status after a week from 27th November 2015 as quoted in his own words below:

“I have two families, in the first home I have constructed an acceptable latrine and achieved ODF status but in my second home I continued promising my wife that I would build for her a latrine. I truly took long to fulfill my promise because of other responsibilities like garden work. As chairman of the village, I always bear the shame of not having a latrine, and now that you people have come the third time, I am going to start today (27/10/2015) and finish everything in one week time.”

RICE extension staff has been monitoring Mr. Pitcha for five days and found that he is a man who fulfills promises; in one week time Mr. Pitcha promised to construct an acceptable latrine, when the staff consistently followed up they found when he had already excavated a pit, raised a wall, gathered roofing materials and on day five he roofed the latrine, rather was only   left with thatching and installing a Tippy Tap, scot hole cover; which he said would be finished after two days.  Pitcha’s children and the wife were very happy for the struggle he was making to put up a latrine after a long period of not having a facility at the premises.

Between April and December 10, 2015, over 150 households in Midia Sub-County had access to latrines for the first time. This was as a result of the implementation of the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All, a Results-based project implemented by RICE-WN with funding from SNV/DFID.

FROM CUT AND COVER TO A DESCENT LATRINE

FROM CUT AND COVER TO A DESCENT LATRINE

Ali’s newly constructed latrine with a hand washing facility
Ali’s newly constructed latrine with a hand washing facility

Ali Safi, a 28 years old resident of Okuberi village, Podo parish in Ludara sub country, is a married man with three children.

RICE-WN SSH4A team met him for the first time during baseline survey when he had no latrine and was using the bush near his home (as seen in picture 1).

After realizing that Ali still hadn’t taken a step to construct a latrine following the triggering during the second follow up; the team decided to re-trigger and fully support him over the course of construction of his pit latrine from excavating the pit, construction of the super structure, including giving advice on the technological option suitable for his area which has rocky soil. This process took about three weeks.

For first time Ali is now using an acceptable latrine after defecating openly for one year and six months.

He has a beautiful latrine with a tight fitting drop-hole cover and hand washing facility with soap.

 “I can now walk with my head up as a household head because of this achievement; I used to get embarrassed when my in-laws visit and direct them to the bush or neighborhood since I had no latrine,” Ali said upon this achievement.

He thanked the program officers and appreciated the project that supported him to register such an achievement for his household.

Between April and December 10, 2015, over 251 households in Ludara Sub-County had access to latrines for the first time. This was as a result of the implementation of the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All, a Results-based project implemented by RICE-WN with funding from SNV/DFID.